Monday, December 24, 2012

New Kid on the Block


Juniper made a hefty investment last week with its acquisition of the little known startup: Contrail Systems. Contrail had been on the market for a mere two days before Juniper made its move to obtain it. The price paid by Juniper for the company was marked at $176 million, quite the price for such a young group. A purchase of this magnitude seems bizarre at first glance, but with the Software Defined Networking (SDN) work Contrail focuses on it becomes very apparent why Juniper decided to make this expenditure. SDN companies have become the hot new technology that everyone wants to get in on; Contrail is just one of many who have seen interest from big IT companies. Though, it could be said that this purchase looks like a defensive move by Juniper in response to VMWare’s attainment of Nicira (another SDN company) a few months back. By making this move, Juniper might be looking to keep up with this emerging technology.

Software Defined Networking, while still in its infancy, is getting some major attention from big networking players like Cisco, IBM, VMware and the like. Basically, SDN makes use of software that allows IT personnel to create a network they can reconfigure quickly and centrally without having to fiddle with individual hardware, which is both costly and time-consuming. This blossoming technology promises to offer companies significant savings by making their networking systems more efficient while at the same time cutting out the need for expensive routers and switches.

What this means for IT departments is more freedom to choose between vendor hardware. At Approved we are blown away by how many Arista coded SFP+’s we’re selling now in such a short period of time as they crush Cisco in most environments price per port. Arista doesn’t support a lot of L3 functions, no BGP, and no IPv6, but they seem to be disrupting Cisco and others on top of rack, large and small clients, international orders as well.

-The Approved Optics Team

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Expanding Enterprise

Cisco Systems Inc. disclosed a deal this week with PT Telekomunikasi Indonesia Tbk. This deal will allow Cisco to deploy approximately 100,000 access points across Indonesia which can be used to offload mobile data and offer more efficient wireless broadband services. A spokesman for Cisco explained, "This will be the largest deployment of Wi-Fi access points by a single service provider in Asia." Cisco’s latest strategy is just one of many new ideas it is employing as it looks for a way to offer high speed data services to a broader customer base. The company is showing how serious it is in the world of carrier Wi-Fi as it is also planning to acquire Meraki Networks Inc. in an effort to further stake a claim in the wireless community.

Aside from expanding into Asian markets and the wireless field, Cisco is also in the process of transitioning into a full-fledged IT vendor as opposed to the communications vendor it is today. Cisco’s CEO, John Chambers, announced that most of their future sales would be greatly diversified with services. Chambers hopes that the company will see a 25% or higher increase in revenues from services within the coming years. While that number might not seem like the largest figure, it does indicate a significant shift in the company’s business model. Moreover, Chambers is banking on his company’s ability to think big as they move toward the future. In a constantly evolving market, companies with the foresight to look ahead stand a far greater chance for smoother and more profitable futures

-The Approved Optics Team

SFP+ Cable Distances defined by Core Size and Band Width


Did you know a standard SFP+ SR supports a link length of only 26m on standard Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI)-grade multimode fiber (MMF). Using 2000MHz*km MMF (OM3), links up to 300m link lengths are possible. Using 4700MHz*km MMF (OM4), up to 400m link lengths are actually possible.

Distances of MM SFP+ 10G SR's

Core Size (Microns)
62.5
62.5
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
Modal Bandwidth (MHz*km)***
160 (FDDI)
200 (OM1)
400
500 (OM2)
2000 (OM3)
4700 (OM4)
Cable Distance
26m
33m
66m
82m
300m
400m

Distances of LRM's

62.5
50.0
50.0
G.652
500
400
500
-
220m
100m
220m
300m